Victorian Network


The Summer 2013 issue of Victorian Network, entitled "Victorian Other Worlds" and guest edited by Professor Cora Kaplan (Southampton University / Queen Mary, University of London), is now available (see below). 

The eighth issue, "Victorian and the Law", is forthcoming in Winter 2013, and the ninth issue, themed "Victorian Bodies and Body Parts", is scheduled for Summer 2014.

Please see our rolling call for peer reviewers

Our previous editions: 


Volume 5, Number 1 (Summer 2013)

Introduction: Victorian Other Worlds

Cora Kaplan
(Southampton University / Queen Mary, University of London)

Victorian Britain’s ‘other worlds’, like our own, were connected to and inspired by the material world of everyday life. The nineteenth-century fascination with alterity of every kind is grounded in its industrial and imperial expansion – perhaps especially when it seeks to escape from their effects. The Victorian imagination – by no means confined to literary and visual art, but expressed there with astonishing richness and brio – was energized by the dizzying and disruptive pace of modernity. The threats and promises of political reform, from the abolition of slavery to the extension of the franchise, not to mention the changing and contested relations between men and women and the accelerated development of scientific knowledge all find their possibilities and drawbacks tried out as romance or fantasy, often juxtaposed with the detailed depiction of the grim conditions of work in Victorian Britain, as they are in Charles Kingsley’s Water-Babies: A Fairy Tale for a Land-Baby (1863), but also erupting in his social novels of the late eighteen forties, Yeast (1848) and Alton Locke (1850). Mid-century adult fiction was a mixed genre in which realism and fancy were intertwined. The alternative to dystopian futures draws longingly on the past. The fondness for medieval stories and settings in Tennyson or the Pre-Raphaelites, the idealizing of feudal society in Disraeli’s fiction, draw this invented past forward, appropriating conservative social imaginary in the face of radical challenges to it in the Victorian everyday. ... Read the full text here.

Download the entire issue (PDF)

Table of Contents

Articles

Victorian Other Worlds: A Victorian Network Conference Abstract PDF
Sarah Crofton (King’s College London), Melissa Dickson (King’s College London), Fariha Shaikh (King’s College London)
Introduction: Victorian Other Worlds Abstract PDF
Cora Kaplan (Southampton University / Queen Mary, University of London)
‘Visual Education’ As The Alternative Mode Of Learning At The Crystal Palace, Sydenham Abstract PDF
Grazia Zaffuto (Independent Scholar)
‘The World Was Very Busy Now, In Sooth, And Had A Lot To Say’: Dickens, China And Chinese Commodities In Dombey And Son Abstract PDF
Hannah Lewis-Bill (University of Exeter)
William Morris’s Utopian Optics Abstract PDF
Owen Holland (University of Cambridge)
Amazons, Science And Common Sense: The Rule of Women in Elizabeth Corbett’s New Amazonia Abstract PDF
Christina Lake (University of Exeter)


Website © Victorian Network 2009-2014. All articles copyright to their respective authors unless otherwise noted.